Back to AIDS

I just finished reading, no devouring, A Home at the End of the World. It’s a rich novel that explores relationships and the limits of love. It begins in the 60’s and I’m uncomfortable because there’s sex but no talk of condoms and I’m furiously flipping pages because I know what the 80’s will bring. There was incredible sadness and fear in the 80’s and the 90’s were marked by slower deaths with anger and activism. There’s an article that needs to be written and it needs a more targeted …

Toddlers and Television, the AAP and Sesame Street

Well that went well. Dr. Ari Brown spat out the words Mommy Blogger a few times with a little more disdain that Sister Susan uses for syphilis or satan. James Steyer was magnificent at promoting his website and chastised me more than once for arguing the science. Because ya know I’m like Michelle Bachman if I argue the quality of the science. Yet I do question the quality of the science. We talked about how low income kids watch more TV and it might not be children’s programming. Perhaps because …

KQED Forum Tomorrow Morning

I’ll be on The Forum with Michael Krasny at 9 tomorrow morning. We’ll be talking about kids and media. The show is on KQED the Bay Area’s NPR affiliate. You may or may not be aware that the AAP has recommended zero screen time for children under two. I suppose I’m invited to add a little color as I cannot comprehend why the AAP would think taking such an extreme stance would support new parents. I’m pretty sure this Washington Post article led them to me. If you don’t live …

Faux Research Harms Everyone

Last week I told y’all that The University of Washington had settled part of a lawsuit with the founders of Baby Einstein. In paying $175,000 of legal fees they admit that they violated the public records act. This may seem like a ho hum piece of news, but it’s really important for families to understand how research at places like the University of Washington affects our daily lives. Dr. Dimitri Christakis has a website (and a lecture business) where he promotes himself as an International Expert on Media and Child …

A Childhood Worth Protecting

It’s only post-Industrial Revolution that we’ve taken our children out of the workforce. Child labor laws were discussed in the early 1800’s. In 1836 Massachusetts instituted a law wherein child workers under the age of 15 had to attend school at least three months of the year. It wasn’t until 1904 that the National Child Labor Committee formed and even with that it was 1938 before laws were passed Nationally. It’s only in the last century that we’ve guarded childhood legislatively. All through the ages it’s been “women and children”, …