Mad Men is Just not Very Good

04.8.12

Since I’ve spent the past two Sundays with Oprah I’ve been a little delayed with Mad Men. Mad Men is on Sunday nights right… or maybe Monday? I’ve also had Mondays with Oprah, which should never be confused with Tuesdays with Morrie.

In any event I finally watched the first two shows (which is three hours) of Mad Men and I was sort of like is that all? I felt really weird about not enjoying it and then reassured. I’m a realist, I know I don’t have the best taste in the world I didn’t give up on Castle easily and everyone knows that it’s a horrendous show.

Mad Men was sort of iconic. It was an amazing and jarring show set in the early 60’s with characters that were larger than life because we scarcely knew anyone who had worked in the late 50’s and early 60’s. It’s somewhat modern but also part of history that we are about to write however we want it. The clothes, the furniture and the lack of technology are all interesting, some of it is beautiful but most of it makes me want to scratch just looking at it.

That first season was also full of tension, will the world find out that Don Draper is a fraud? Will his wife leave him? Will Joanie ever have a real relationship? There were plots and subplots and characters that were interesting. Women were treated in ways that made us gasp, not because they were dismissed, but because they allowed it.

What the first seasons also had was amazing cinematography. It was slow, languid even with the camera not being part of the show. You weren’t feeling like you were watching TV so much as maybe a film or maybe even a TV show that was shot in the 50’s. One of the things that I enjoyed was that you could see ceilings. Watch network TV a little and see how many ceilings there are, and please, we don’t all live in lofts.

This year I noticed on the credits that Jon Hamm produced both episodes and directed Tea Leaves (the second episode). Mr. G says that sending your star in as a director is like having your pitcher bat 5th. I don’t really know what that means but I suspect that it’s an indication that Jon Hamm is just as bored with that show as I am.

 

Oprah Wants My Life and I Do Too

04.4.12

Last week I met Ms. Oprah Winfrey. She was everything I expected and my expectations were high.

While in St. Louis six of us were allowed to interview Oprah except we didn’t have cameras or even paper and pen. The team from OWN ran video and I’m hopeful that it will air as part of their behind the scenes features online.

Everyone introduced themselves to Ms. Winfrey and it became abundantly clear why she owned the airwaves for the more than two decades. When Oprah sets her sights on you she pulls the most relevant details out of you as if there’s a string attached and one tug from her unleashes everything. She is a remarkable woman embarking on a remarkable journey.

When Ms. Winfrey made her way to me I told her I was a blogger. I’m thinking that I was the only one in the group who didn’t have a related career. She said to me, “So you just sit around and write all day?”

“No I can’t just sit around and write all day. I have to actually do something so I have something to write about. I never miss picking my kids up from school and I never miss tennis.” I explained.

Oprah’s head whipped around in search of Sherri Salata and she said, “Sherry do you hear this? She never misses a tennis lesson. I think we’re doing something wrong here.” And then she turned to look at me and said, “You don’t need LifeClass you’re living the dream.”

And I knew she was right, because I am living the dream. The adjusted dream. The dream where we live modestly and my husband loves me and I love him just a little bit more than that and the kids love us but we secretly know that we love them more than they could ever love us because that’s the secret all parents share.

That dream.

I had a question for her and she gave me an answer I think I’ll remember for for as long as I blog. I asked Oprah how she dealt with negative feedback. I started to explain that bloggers get a lot of grief in comments and on places like twitter and her answer stunned me.

Oprah Winfrey went to on talk in detail about a woman who was mean to hear on twitter. She mentioned her name, twice. She went on to talk a little bit about the solution and quoted her friend Maya Angelou:

No one can hold a candle to the light that God shines upon you.

I think I got that quote right. It was really quite beautiful when Oprah told it to me and what struck me was that with all of her success and millions of people saying, “Oprah you changed my life, you made me better, you made my life happier.” Ms. Winfrey would still remember the name of one detractor on twitter and this made me love her a little.

It reminded me how vulnerable we can all be. It reminded me as a parent that although I may congratulate Jane on her accomplishments the things that she may remember are the failures and the criticisms. When I talk to Alexander after baseball games I need to be more aware of the good plays because it’s clear that he remembers and replays the bad ones, he doesn’t need any help with that.

I spent the day Tuesday in New York City. I did the chazzerai tour of the Lower East Side picking up wasabi peanuts from Economy Candy, tees from Katz’ Deli (and a sandwich for myself), and bagels from Kossar’s. I stopped into Ross and Daughters but I couldn’t bring myself to schlep a smoked trout on the plane. In hindsight I could have, the flight was all Chasidim and I could smell deli food everywhere.

I went uptown and found a pair of shoes at Bergdorf’s and then headed across Fifth Avenue to grab Jane a little charm from Tiffany and Co. As I walked toward the third floor elevator a familiar voice said, “Jessica!” and we left Tiffany to have a snack and talk about our kids. It was my friend Jon who used to live in LA but now lives in one of the Carolinas (North I think?).

It’s totally normal to run into your friends 3,000 miles from home. Right?

I’m still digesting the messages of Oprah’s LifeClass. At the very moment it seemed totally irrelevant to my own life something would resonate deeply. I wouldn’t have traded that experience for anything.